Retaining wall Contractor

We build, design, and repair retaining walls in the San Francisco Bay Area

Installing a retaining wall in the East Bay, Contra Costa County, CA area.

Installing a retaining wall in the East Bay, Contra Costa County, CA area.

Best retaining wall construction company in the San Francisco Bay Area.

As a retaining wall contractor in the East Bay, we repair and build new retaining walls. We have the experience and reputation of designing retaining walls that last. We use the highest quality materials, with an experienced crew working together on San Francisco Bay Area projects for over 12 years. We offer free written estimates and guarantee all our work.

steep slopes into terraced background in Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

Steep slopes into terraced backgrounds built in Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

What are the benefits of a well-designed retaining wall?

Reduce soil erosion, turn steep slopes into terraced backgrounds, and create focal points in the landscape-retaining walls with multiple uses. In fact, they are some of the most common ways to correct problems caused by hilly areas! A carefully constructed retaining wall turns the unusable slope into an outdoor space usable in the garden.

Wood retaining wall built to look as natural as possible in the East Bay

Wood retaining wall built to look as natural as possible in the East Bay

Why choose us to build your retaining wall?

We are exceptional at engineering retaining walls to limit the soil between two different heights or unnatural slopes prevalent in the Northern California Bay Area.

The most crucial consideration that we understand when designing your retaining wall is that any retaining wall design requires extensive knowledge of lateral earth pressure (defined as the pressure caused by backfilling). According to Concrete Network, the force generated by the lateral earth pressure constitutes most of the load that the wall will resist. When assessing the pressure of a specific road section for the first time, several basic soil parameters need to be paid attention to. Soil unit weight, internal friction angle, cohesion, plasticity index, and groundwater level affect the overall lateral earth pressure behind the wall.

Retaining Walls and Engineering

Essential things we consider when designing your retaining wall?

Despite their simple appearance, retaining walls require much planning—and professional engineering—to maintain their shape. The soil is heavy, especially during the recent heavy rain, so a basic retaining wall (3 feet high and 15 feet long) may have to withstand up to 20 tons of soil pressure. For every foot of height increase, the soil pressure increases significantly. We are experts at calculating these factors to ensure you get a retaining wall that won't fail over time.

How long do our retaining walls last?
In our opinion, the design life of a retaining wall should be based on the potentially harmful effects of the material composition of the wall. Our walls generally have a design service life of at least 50 years.

Natural stone retaining wall built in Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

Beautiful Stone wall adds aesthetic value

We build four types of retaining walls.

Retaining walls are a common choice of hardscaping. Fortunately, they come in many shapes, sizes, and forms that can allow you to choose from a range of options. A retaining wall will help add aesthetic value to any home while simultaneously creating a space within which you can add flowers or other more aesthetically pleasing functional elements. They're great for saving soil that is prone to erosion, too! With an endless number of options available here are the 4 basic types.

Gravity retaining wall

Gravity Retaining Wall

Gravity Retaining Wall

While most commonly used in building construction, the most basic of retaining walls can also be used in landscaping to hold back soil or other materials. This type of wall relies heavily on its weight and mass to hold back the materials it keeps at bay. As such, these kinds of retaining walls allow for a great deal of variety in the types of materials used to create these barriers. For example, some choose to use bricks while others prefer pavers, while some prefer dry-stacked stone. These types of plain basement walls are typically shorter in width, which means no additional reinforcement is required; however, for some taller projects, you will need to dig a small trench into which your wall will fit. In contrast, others may require an additional concrete footing on which the walls are placed.

Reinforced Cantilevered Retaining Wall

Reinforced Cantilevered Retaining Wall

Reinforced Cantilevered Retaining Wall

Sometimes called a "reinforced retaining wall," the cantilevered design uses concrete, steel, or masonry wall attached to a foundation that juts out into the soil under the surface. This construction style is trendy among commercial construction projects because it utilizes quality materials that are easy to install and maintain, saving money on labor costs. For an even more advanced design, there is also the option of using "counter-fort" or "buttressed" retaining structures built with additional vertical support beams, given their increased strength and rigidity.

Sheet Piling Retaining Wall

Sheet Piling Retaining Wall in the East Bay

Sheet Piling Retaining Wall

A basic wall, used when space is an issue, is commonly used because it doesn't require a supporting structure behind it. Soil removed for this type of wall often needs to be replaced to prevent soil erosion. This retaining wall is usually reinforced by corrugated metal or wood, which runs vertically along its surface. Sheet piling can only be installed in softer soils. Typically, you should allow one-third of the pilings to be buried underground versus two-thirds above ground to provide proper support.

Anchored Retaining Wall

Anchored Retaining Wall

Anchored Retaining Wall

When you want to create a retaining wall where the landscape slopes away from the wall, then an anchored retaining wall will be required. For retaining walls that are not the typical hillside, the anchors hold them in place by strategically placing them in the ground behind the wall in front. These anchors are usually mechanically forced into the ground. Their ends expanded to secure your wall in place in front of it. This method is used to control erosion by holding back the earth. Over time, water can run downslope towards lower grounds instead of risking collapse because of running downhill too fast. You can use this option for structurally thin walls or where higher loads could cause them to break.